Cornell University

Frequently Asked Questions

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Table of Contents

General

On-Campus Recruiting (Students)

On-Campus Recruiting (Employers)

Human Medicine

Veterinary Medicine

Extern Program

FRESH Program

Develop Your Own Internship Program

University Career Fair Days

Central New York Communications Consortium

Fellowships

Graduate Study: Admissions Test

Credential Services

General

I need to speak with an advisor right away. Can I come in?

Yes, Cornell Career Services has walk-in hours every day, Monday through Friday while classes are in session. Call or stop by your college career office or 103 Barnes Hall to learn our walk in hours.

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I'm only a Freshman. Should I be thinking about a career already?

Sure. It's never too early to begin exploring career options. Check out materials in our Career Library for things which might interest you. You may also apply for internships and externships that let you spend a day or two shadowing a professional in the workplace to see what his or her job is like. Stop by during walk-in times to chat with us.

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What is the difference between the offices in Barnes Hall and my college career office?

All of these offices together make up Cornell Career Services, and you can use the services. The service in the college career offices are tailored to the needs of students pursuing the college's particular academic paths. Services in Barnes Hall are open to all students in the 7 undergraduate schools and the college  ------ Graduate School; and are not major- or discipline-specific which office to use.

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How do I obtain an official transcript?

Students can now request an official transcript through the Registrars Office free of charge.

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On-Campus Recruiting (Students)

What kind of jobs are employers recruiting for?

Most of the employers who come to Cornell are recruiting students for permanent positions, but there are some interview schedules designed specifically for summer employment.

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Why won't the system let me submit my resume?

Some possible reasons are:

  • You have not completed the online tutorial
  • Your graduation date does not match what the employer is seeking
  • Your employment status does not match the employer's requirements (e.g., work authorization)
  • The employer is seeking a different level or field of education
  • The resume submission deadline has passed

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Where is my interview being held?

After you have chosen a time slot, go into "What I have signed up for", there is a field called "Room/Location", which will indicate the location of the interview. 

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What is a pre-select and alternate?

Pre-select - You are the employer's first choice for the interview. The employer selects the same number of pre-selects as time slots on the interview schedule. You have first access to the schedule, however on the pre-determined, posted date, alternates will be able to access the schedule as well. Once alternates have access to the schedule, time slots are filled on a first come, first served basis.

Alternate - You are selected by the employer to fill any time slots left open by pre-selects. Alternates can access the schedule the last few days that it is open. The specific access date is viewable on the CCNet system.

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Can I change my interview time to another time slot?

Select Your Active Applications under the "Applications" tab on the navigation bar. Click on the Details … link for the desired application. On the Application Details page, under Employer Decision, click on "Choose a Different Interview Slot". On the Interview Sign Up page, find the schedule date you would like to sign up for and select the Time radio button associated with the time slot you desire. Click Save and your slot is reserved.

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Do I need a resume?

Resumes are not required and we encourage you to attend even if you don't have your resume complete. If you are actively seeking a position, it is to your benefit to bring a supply of resumes to the Career Fair. Don't be discouraged, though, if the employer representatives refer you to the organization's online resume submission system. More and more employers are requesting electronic resumes rather than collecting paper ones at the fairs.

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On-Campus Recruiting (Employers)

Can I interview students from other area colleges while at Cornell?

No—Cornell's recruiting facilities are for exclusive use by Cornell students.

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How are interview schedules determined?

Candidates. Interview schedules, with the exception of the College of Architecture, Art, and Planning are 100% prescreened by the employer through CCNet.

Start/end Time for Interviews; Interview Length. Depending on the college career office, the typical schedule consists of 12 to 13 half-hour interviews beginning at 8:30 am and ending at 4:30 pm. A 15-minute break is scheduled in the morning and afternoon, and lunch is scheduled from 12:15 to 1:15 pm. Interview length variations must be indicated under Special Requests when completing the online Interview Date Request.

Schedule variations can be arranged due to travel arrangements or other reasons but no later than three (3) business days before the interview date.

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What is the typical daily interview schedule?

Depending on the college career office, the typical schedule consists of 12 to 13 half hour interviews beginning at 8:30 am and ending at 4:30 pm. A 15-minute break is scheduled in the morning and afternoon and lunch is scheduled from 12:15 to 1:15 pm. Interview length variations must be discussed when reservations are made through the scheduling coordinator. Schedule variations can be arranged due to travel arrangements or other reasons but no later than three (3) business days before the interview date.

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May I make arrangements for additional rooms for second round interviews or greeters?

Space is extremely limited, especially during the recruiting season. Although we will try to help you if you have additional needs, our first priority is to assign rooms to employers who will be conducting first-round interviews. If we have space after meeting all these requests we will consider arrangements for second round interviews, testing space, and/or rooms for greeters. Extra space is never available unless advance arrangements have been made. Greeters who arrive without prearrangement may be asked to leave.

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What do the recruiters need to know?

Recruiters should be informed about:

  • Cornell Career Services' recruiting policies regarding offer deadlines and second round interviews, etc. Recruiters should not suggest to students that they attend off-campus second round interviews or events prior to the dates outlined in the policies.
  • Possible changes—cancellations, additions, etc.—to the schedules assembled by their organization. Recruiters should be reminded to check the schedule in career services for the most up-to-date information.
  • Start/end time of interviews, and interview location. Recruiters should arrive at least 15 minutes before their first interview.
  • Use of the facilities of the college career offices are for the use of University business. Interviewers should not plan on conducting non-recruiting business (for example, conference calls) from the career office. If you must schedule unrelated business, please speak with the receptionist in the recruiting office when you recruit to learn if alternate space is available. We appreciate your understanding of our limitations.

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Can recruiters have lunch with career office directors and/or faculty members?

We welcome the opportunity to meet with recruiters and share information. Please be aware that our lunch meetings are "Dutch Treat" by necessity. If you are interested in having lunch with one of the college career office directors, please let them know when you first arrive, or better yet, in advance of your visit. We would be happy to try to arrange lunch with faculty members or other Cornell contacts with advance notice.

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Equal Employment Opportunity and NACE Employer Principles for Employment

Employers who recruit at Cornell University must adhere to Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) guidelines and the National Association of Colleges and Employers Principles for Employment Professionals. If you would like further information about NACE, call 800/544-5272.

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Human Medicine

Which college should I enroll in?

As a Cornell undergraduate, you may enroll in the courses that fulfill the requirements of medical schools, regardless of college. Traditionally, Cornell undergraduate applicants to medical school have enrolled in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Engineering, and the College of Human Ecology. Your choice of college depends on your academic interests and goals; remember that academic success and engagement are linked.

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What should I major in?

Your choice of a major reflects your personal interests and professional orientation. Base your decision on what you want to learn, not how others will view you. The strength of the academic credentials, rather than the major, is the best predictor of who gains admission to health career schools. You are more likely to succeed at –– and benefit from –– subjects that interest and stimulate you. Health career graduate schools do not require, recommend, or favor any particular undergraduate major course of study, and Cornell does not have a pre-health career major. In majors offered throughout the university, you can complete the pre-professional requirements while at the same time exploring your own interests. In this way, you exercise the option of discovering an alternative career.

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) has stated, "Admission committee members know that medical students can develop the essential skills of acquiring, synthesizing, applying and communicating information through a wide variety of academic disciplines…. Students who select a major area of study solely or primarily because of the perception that it will enhance the chance of acceptance to a school of medicine are not making a decision in their best interest.”

Despite statements like the above, many students believe that medical schools prefer certain major areas. AAMC’s national data, however, refute this. In 2015, 39% of biological sciences majors, 44% of physical sciences majors, 42% of mathematics and statistics majors, 46% of humanities majors, and 41% of social sciences majors that applied matriculated to medical school.  The differences among percentages of acceptance by major are not significant, and major choice cannot be used to predict acceptance to medical school.

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What courses should I take?

Cornell course recommendations are based on two criteria: fulfilling prerequisites for most health career professions and providing optimal coverage for standardized admissions exams, which test the knowledge gained from undergraduate coursework.

Professional schools have their own rules regarding courses they will accept. For details on a particular school’s requirements students are advised to read the individual school’s web pages, check the Medical School Admission Requirements (MSAR) database and the ADEA Official Guide to Dental Schools, or contact admissions offices. Generally speaking, regardless of undergraduate major, professional graduate schools require specific undergraduate coursework. Cornell offers all required courses, often in alternative formats, such as individualized instruction (sometimes called auto-tutorial) or lecture-based. While these prerequisites vary between professions, certain minimum requirements are standard within each health profession. For medicine, for example, all general or introductory science courses must include a lab component or offer an additional course that is lab only.

The required and/or strongly recommended subjects, in alphabetical order, are:

  • Anatomy/Physiology; often required for PA/NP; otherwise an elective
  • Biology, introductory; replacement with AP credit is discouraged
  • Biochemistry; lab not required
  • Chemistry; general and organic
  • Microbiology; often required for PA/NP; otherwise an elective Physics; general
  • English
  • Math; statistics and calculus
  • Social Science; introductory sociology and psychology (see pink pages in this guide)

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What guidance does Cornell give health career-oriented undergraduates?

Cornell has a structured Health Careers Program. The Career Library and the health careers advisor in Barnes Hall provide information, orientation sessions, and advising for students in all colleges. The advisor has walk-in advising hours and scheduled appointments, and can also be reached by e-mail and telephone. Advising information is also available on the Health Careers webpage accessed through Cornell Career Services: career.cornell.edu.

Most of the questions freshman, sophomores, and junior transfer students pose relate to academic requirements. It is best to address these questions to an advisor in your college or major.

  • College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, CALS Career Services, Roberts Hall
  • College of Arts and Sciences, Ana Adinolfi, 172 Goldwin Smith Hall
  • College of Engineering, Liane Fitzgerald, 167 Olin Hall
  • College of Human Ecology, Verdene Lee, 172 Martha Van Rensselaer Hall
  • Office of Undergraduate Biology, 216 Stimson Hall
  • Several advisors are available depending on your question: Beth Howland, Megan Gallagher, Jeff McCaffrey, Colleen Kearns and student peer advisors.

This Cornell Health Careers Guide for First and Second Year Pre-Medical Students is given out at Freshmen/Transfer Student Orientation and is available in various office on campus and on the Career Services website. The Cornell Health Careers Guide for Advanced Pre-Medical Students is also available from the Career Services website.

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Veterinary Medicine

Which college should I enroll in?

A student in any undergraduate college at Cornell may enroll in the courses required for entry into veterinary college. Cornell undergraduate applicants to veterinary school are enrolled primarily in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences with a few in the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Engineering, and the College of Human Ecology. The appropriate choice depends largely on your other academic and career interests. Students should consult the University's publications for information about the seven colleges at Cornell, reviewing their requirements, majors, and course descriptions.

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What should I major in?

Veterinary schools do not require or recommend any particular undergraduate major course of study or designated preveterinary program. Cornell does not have a preveterinary major and there is no evidence that admissions committees of veterinary colleges give special consideration to any particular undergraduate education beyond satisfactory completion of the required undergraduate courses; for this reason you are encouraged to pursue your own intellectual interest in an academic major.

For example, a student might major in animal science, biological sciences, natural resources or development sociology in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Or you might major in biological sciences, English, anthropology in the College of Arts and Sciences or nutrition in the College of Human Ecology. You complete the preprofessional core of courses while at the same time receiving a broad education, and exploring other interests and careers. In this way, you leave open the option of pursuing an alternative career. You are also more likely to succeed at and benefit from subjects that interest and stimulate you, and you leave open the option of pursuing an alternative career.

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What courses should I take?

Veterinary schools, while not requiring or recommending any particular major course of study, do require that particular undergraduate courses be completed. Listed below are the minimum course requirements for admission to the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University. Veterinary Medical School Admission Requirements (VMSAR) contains details for other schools.

English Composition

6 semester credit hours

Biology or Zoology (with laboratory)

6 semester credit hours

Introductory Chemistry (with laboratory)

6 semester credit hours

Organic Chemistry (with laboratory)

6 semester credit hours

Biochemistry

4 semester credit hours

Physics (with laboratory)

6 semester credit hours

General Microbiology (with laboratory)

3 semester credit hours

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Education for becoming a veterinarian: a wider view

In discussing science courses required for entry to veterinary school, it is important to realize that these are only a part of the total educational picture that veterinary schools consider. It is generally agreed that an applicant must be able to perform well in science, to think like a scientist, and even to enjoy science in order to be a competent veterinarian. Being an educated person with an understanding of human nature and human achievement is equally important to veterinarians, both professionally and personally.

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What kinds of animal care related experience do I need?

Veterinary medicine is an animal oriented profession. Therefore, your experiences working with different kinds of animals in different settings and your understanding of the veterinary profession are important consideration in the selection process. Such experience could involve breeding, rearing, feeding and showing various kinds of animals including companion animals, livestock, laboratory animals, zoo animals or wildlife. You should be prepared to present evidence of hands-on experience with animals and sufficient contact with the veterinary profession so that the admissions committee can determine that you have some understanding of the duties and responsibilities of a practitioner and the scope of veterinary medicine.

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What are the acceptance statistics for veterinary schools?

For the classes entering the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University (CVMCU) for the past five years, generally over 20 members of the class were from Cornell. Approximately 100 Cornellians apply to CVMCU each year. No figures are currently available for Cornell students accepted at veterinary schools other than Cornell. Nationally, in 2008 there were over 6,000 applicants to U.S. vet school and over to 2,700 enrolled.

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What is the current employment outlook for vets?

Seventy-five percent of all veterinarians are in private practice, however, veterinarians are employed by government, business, universities, and the military in a wide variety of research, regulatory, and clinical roles. In 2006 the average starting salary for recent graduates was around $56,000 for small animal to $61,000 for large animal practice. The median annual earnings of veterinarians was $72,000 in 2006.  Federally employed veterinarians averaged $84,335 in 2007.

Most enrolled need to borrow to cover veterinary college expenses. In order to be able to get loans, be sure to maintain a good credit rating throughout your college years. In 2006 the mean national indebtedness of veterinary graduates was $90,654. 

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What is the Double Registration Program?

The double registration program between Cornell University and the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University is approved for students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. It enables a qualified student to save one year in pursuit of the Bachelor and D.V.M. degrees. The program is intended for students who have been admitted to the College of Veterinary Medicine after completing three years of undergraduate work and who have made sufficient progress on the Bachelor's Degree requirements. Certain courses taken in the College of Veterinary Medicine can be used to complete those requirements. Questions about the  program may be directed to Catherine Thompson, CALS prehealth/prevet advisor in 140 Roberts Hall.

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What help does Cornell provide for health careers students?

The Health Careers Program is located in Cornell Career Services, 103 Barnes Hall, provides informational programs, library resources, and advising for students and distributes the Cornell Preveterinary Guide. Members of the university-wide Health Careers Advising Network also do advising.

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What other resources are available?

A sample of books available in the  Career Library, 103 Barnes Hall. 

American Animal Hospital Association Accredited Practice Directory
American Zoo and Aquarium Membership Directory
Career Choices for Veterinarians: Beyond Private Practice, Carin Smith, DVM
Careers with Animals, Ellen Shenk
Extraordinary Jobs with Animals, Alecia Devantier & Carol Turkington
Get Into Veterinary School - Insights by an Admission Expert, Joseph Piekunka
Opportunites in Zoo Careers, Sydney J. Butter

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Extern Program

Are there connection opportunities in every state? How about internationally?

While we work hard each year to market the program to alumni in a variety of geographic locations of interest to students, we don’t always get all of them to participate. We do get a wide variety of career fields and specialties that are available both in the U.S. and worldwide, so there is likely something available for everyone who applies. If you can’t travel, consider applying for phone/Skype information interview opportunities in fields of interest.

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Can I apply if I am an international student?

International Students are eligible for any opportunity in the program as long as the sponsor has not indicated on the listing a special requirement for U.S. citizenship. These are not paid experience opportunities like internships, so they do not have any visa requirements.

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Can I apply if I am studying abroad?

Yes, you need to clearly articulate your expectations of the opportunity to your sponsor. If you are arranging a phone/Skype session be clear about the time difference. If you are arranging an in person meeting, be clear about when you are returing to the U.S.

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Can I get more than one opportunity?

Yes. Students are eligible to apply to two job shadowing opportunities per semester and one additional opportunity in summer. At this time, students can participate in unlimited phone interviews.

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Can I turn a shadowing experience into an information interview?

No. Alumni determine what experience options they would specifically like to offer and for a certain length of time.

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Do I have to participate in an information session and/or orientation session if I participated last year?

Information Sessions
No. Information sessions are not required, however they will continue to be offered to provide a general overview of the program.

Orientation Programs
Orientation is required for all participants. Once you've attended an orientation program you will not have to attend any future orientations to participate.

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What do requirements and preferences mean in the listing?

Requirements and preferences are stipulated by the sponsor and are meant to give you an idea of what type of student would be most successful in taking advantage of this opportunity.

 

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What if I don’t find an opportunity near my geographic location over break?

First of all, don’t let location restrict you! While it is true that you will have to pay for and arrange your own travel to the opportunity, you could do one of two things: 

  1. Look for locations where you might be able to do a flight stop over as you travel back to Cornell, where you could stay with a relative, or where you could stay with the family of a Cornell friend, or
  2. Apply for opportunities that are phone/Skype information interviews only. You won’t have to travel to the sponsor’s location and you can still learn a lot about their organization, career field, and gain their advice!

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FRESH Program

What should I keep in mind as I apply for externships?

  1. Some sponsors can only take one student while others can take more.
  2. The more externships you choose in Round 1, the more likely you are to be matched.
  3. Popular medical/financial externships fill up fast! Keep an open-mind as you apply.
  4. Round 2 submissions are automatically matched! Don’t hit submit unless you can commit!

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Are there connection opportunities in every state? How about internationally?

While we work hard each year to market the program to alumni in a variety of geographic locations of interest to students, we don’t always get all of them to participate. We do get a wide variety of career fields and specialties that are available both in the U.S. and worldwide, so there is likely something available for everyone who applies. If you can’t travel, consider applying for phone/Skype information interview opportunities in fields of interest.

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Can I apply if I am an international student?

International Students are eligible for any opportunity in the program as long as the sponsor has not indicated on the listing a special requirement for U.S. citizenship. These are not paid experience opportunities like internships, so they do not have any visa requirements.

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What if I don’t find an opportunity near my geographic location over break?

First of all, don’t let location restrict you! While it is true that you will have to pay for and arrange your own travel to the opportunity, you could do one of two things: 

  1. Look for locations where you might be able to do a flight stop over as you travel back to Cornell, where you could stay with a relative, or where you could stay with the family of a Cornell friend, or
  2. Apply for opportunities that are phone/Skype information interviews only. You won’t have to travel to the sponsor’s location and you can still learn a lot about their organization, career field, and gain their advice!

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Can I get more than one externship?

Yes. If you get matched with an externship in Round 1, you can apply to be matched again in Round 2. Be sure to only apply for externships in Round 2 that do not conflict in terms of date(s) and time with your Round 1 match.

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As an upperclassman, how can I participate in FRESH?

  1. Attend FRESH walk-in hours; see Round 2 Important Dates and Deadlines.
  2. Begin a Round 2 checklist.
  3. Complete the online orientation (if you participated in the Extern Program, you will not need to repeat this step).
  4. Submit up to two applications – remember, don’t submit if you can’t commit!

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Develop Your Own Internship Program

How much money will I make?

The typical student earns between $2,500-$4,000, depending on hourly wage, the number of hours worked per week, and the number of weeks worked. For example, if you're paid $10.00/hour and work 9 weeks for 35 hours/week you'll earn $3,150 before taxes. (Your employer must withhold all appropriate State, Federal, and FICA taxes.) Keep in mind that all financial aid students have a Student Contribution from Summer Earnings amount as part of their academic-year aid package. 

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Can I take summer classes and still participate in the DYO program?

Yes, but you must be taking fewer than 6 credit hours if working full-time. If you are planning to take 6 or more credit hours, you must complete a Summer Financial Aid Application (in 203 Day Hall), and you would not be eligible for funding for full-time work. If you are unsure about the number of credit hours you will be taking during the summer, complete both applications and adjustments will be made at the time your summer status is finalized. It is your responsibility to keep us and your employer informed of your plans and intentions. You will not be approved for both Summer Financial Aid and DYO funding; you will need to notify us which you plan to accept before approval is final.

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Do I complete a DYO funding application for all summer work-study opportunities?

No. The DYO form is not used if:

  1. you apply for a job through the New York City Public Service Corps,
  2. you will be working on Cornell's campus, or for a non-profit agency in the Ithaca/Tompkins County with the Community Work-Study Program, or
  3. you will take 6 or more credit hours at Cornell during the summer.

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Does this program place me into a job?

No, the program does not guarantee you a position. What the DYO program does is help make you more attractive to a potential employer in a competitive job market by offering the possibility of a partial reimbursement to the employer for a significant portion of your gross earnings. It's up to you to conduct an effective job search and to identify potential opportunities. 

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May I submit more than one DYO Funding Request Application?

Yes, but funding will be approved for only one employer. If you submit more than one DYO we will ask you to choose which employer is more important to you. Therefore, only submit DYO applications for employers with whom you have a realistic potential for being hired.

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Is there an application deadline?

We award funding on a rolling basis, beginning in March. It is strongly encouraged you submit a completed application (both employer and student sections) by mid May. No applications are accepted after June 16.

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Do you take a waitlist for late applications?

A waitlist is used only if funding gets low, which rarely happens. We cannot accept applications after June 16, so late applications are not reviewed.

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When do I know if my DYO has been approved?

Starting in March we send approvals and denials to students by e-mail. Generally you will receive an answer 1-2 weeks after a completed application, from both employer and student, is received.

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Is there a special list of DYO Employers?

No. Any non-profit organization (including many universities, hospitals, non-partisan governmental agencies, etc.) and, in some cases, small for-profit businesses, who pay an hourly wage may be eligible for funding approval. Whether you find the employer throught a job positng or your initiative and networking, the intent of the DYO Program is for you to find/develop a career related summer internship that may not otherwise be advertised. Don't be afraid to approach a potential employer or faculty member to discuss your career goals, your skills and background, and to explore the possibility of establishing a paid internship opportunity with the organization on a trial basis. You have nothing to lose!

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Can I get FWS funding to work an on-campus summer internship?

Yes, however, you not use the DYO Program application form to request the funding. For students with Federal Work Study and working at an on-campus department over the summer, you need to visit the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment’s web page for their summer on-campus application form that is online.
 
For students with Federal Work Study and looking to work with a non-profit/community service employer in the Ithaca area within Tompkins County, you need to apply through the Community Work-Study Program, managed by the Public Service Center, located in Kennedy Hall, third floor.

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University Career Fair Days

Who can attend the Career Fair?

The Career Fair is open to all interested Cornell undergraduates and students registered in the Graduate School.

The Career Fair events are strictly limited to Cornell students. Attendees must present a Cornell student identification card.

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Why should I attend the Career Fair...isn't it just for seniors and engineering students?

The Career Fair is for all students in all majors! Although some employers are looking for students with specific majors, many companies are looking for students from any field. You can review the database of participating organizations to determine which employers are interested in students in your major.

Come one or both days, according to your career interests. The first day—General Interest Day—is primarily for non-technical career interests and the second day is geared toward Engineering and Technical interests.

The Career Fair offers an informal setting in which you can:

  • speak with recruiters directly about current and future job or internship opportunities
  • learn about industry trends
  • investigate areas new to you
  • identify companies and industries that are new and growing
  • drop off a resume
  • gather company information to prepare for potential on-campus interviews

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How do I prepare?

Your preparation depends on what your needs are.

  • Research the company through the database of participating organizations and the employer's website (if available). Additional resources are available in the 103 Barnes Hall Library.
  • Prepare an up-to-date resume.
  • Read helpful articles and tips on making career fairs work for you.
  • If you are merely exploring career options, review the database of participating organizations and prepare a few specific questions to ask the recruiters. At the Fair, pick up any available literature.

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What should I wear?

You'll meet with some employers who are wearing suits and with others wearing "business casual" (golf shirts and khaki pants), or even casual. If you want to make a positive impression, be sure to look neat, clean, and presentable. "Dress to impress" is always a good idea! It's often said that employers form an impression within the first 10 seconds of meeting a candidate!

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Are there other career fairs at Cornell?

Yes, there are several other career fairs on campus, as well as other recruiting events that Cornell sponsors. In addition, you should stay informed of recruiting events sponsored by other organizations that are open to Cornell students.

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Central New York Communications Consortium

Who can participate?

Cornell degree candidates and undergraduates interested in pursuing careers in the Communications industry are encouraged to participate.

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Which employers participate?

Different employers attend the Consortium each year; the number of employers who register generally ranges from 25—30. The list of registered employers and job descriptions can be viewed at the CNYCC homepage, which is hosted by Ithaca College. Be sure to check periodically for additions and cancellations. Also check to see if firms offer full-time jobs and/or internships; not all employers offer both.

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Where can I find information on an employer?

Check for reference materials in the Cornell Career Services Library, refer to trade journals, business magazines, Lexis/Nexis searches, etc. Employers will expect you to be familiar with their websites.

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Must I accept the interviews?

If selected to interview you must accept or decline EACH scheduled interview by the deadline; therefore, you can choose to refuse a given interview. If you fail to respond by the deadline, your interview slot(s) will be given to an alternate candidate(s). The alternate will not necessarily be a Cornell student; therefore, please apply only to companies in which you have a genuine interest so that another Cornell student does not lose a chance to interview. The Cornell Career Services no-show policy as outlined in the OCR recruiting policy is in effect for the CNYCC.

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How do I get an interview with a specific employer if I'm not selected?

There are two options available to you. You can attend the Information Fair on April 19, where you can meet many of the recruiters, gather information about the organization, and discuss the possibility of arranging an interview with that employer at another place and time. [Last year a number of students picked up last minute interviews because some of the primary candidates had canceled!] Or, you can send your cover letter and resume directly to the organization by referring to the Employer Job Descriptions for contact information and addresses.

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How many Cornell students get interviews?

It changes every year depending on the number of Cornell students who apply, their background, experience and majors, and what the participating employers are looking for from the pool of candidates. Typically 20% of the interview schedules are filled by Cornell students.

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What is the Information Fair and why should I attend?

The Information Fair is an informal event attended by most of the employers. This fair is open to ALL students, whether or not you were selected to interview. There are several good reasons to attend: you might be able to arrange interviews with employers who have openings on their interview schedules; you can prepare for your interviews by meeting with that employer representatives and picking up more information about the organization; and, you can attend presentations held by some of the employers to provide detailed information about their organization and to answer questions. In addition, the Information Fair is attended by employers who missed the registration deadline, but who still want to meet students, take resumes, and possibly schedule future interviews.

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How do I get to Syracuse?

If you don't have a car, access to a car, or a friend who is willing to drive you up to Syracuse for the day, don't give up. A number of Cornell and Ithaca College students will be driving to Syracuse and you might be able to car pool with someone; a list of Cornell students who are willing to offer rides will be kept in 203 Barnes. Maps are provided when you confirm your interview schedules. Students who are scheduled for interviews on both Tuesday and Wednesday may find it more convenient to book a hotel room and stay in Syracuse overnight. The driving time to Syracuse University is approximately one and one half hours; however, plan at least two hours to allow time to park and to find the interview location.

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Will employers be interviewing for internships?

Some will; some will not. You need to check each job description to determine if an employer is interviewing for internships, full-time entry level jobs, or both. There are fewer internships offered than full-time jobs.

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Fellowships

What are fellowships?

Fellowships, sometimes called scholarships, fund study or research. Awards are made on a competitive basis, usually with no regard for financial need. Fellowships are designed with specific goals in mind and are not generally used for exploratory purposes.

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What kinds of fellowships are available?

Fellowships are as various as the foundations and individuals who create them. Generally, however, they are for one of several purposes:

  • undergraduate or graduate study in a given field
  • study in a particular geographic location or research facility
  • professional development 
  • dissertation research

Eligibility may sometimes be limited to:

  • members of specific racial, ethnic, or gender groups
  • residents of a particular region
  • members of specific groups or organizations
  • applicants with specific career plans

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Who should consider applying for fellowships?

Consider applying for a fellowship if your plans after graduation include:

  • graduate school
  • professional school
  • study abroad
  • professional development

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What sort of academic record do you need to qualify?

The competitiveness of fellowships varies. Usually GPA is a significant factor in the application process. If you have contributed in some tangible way to Cornell, to your field of study, or to your community, you may be a strong candidate. Seek out the fellowships that value your strengths and goals.

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When should I apply?

If you want to receive fellowship funding beginning the fall after graduation from Cornell, your application timetable would be something like this:

Junior Year

  • Conduct reasearch to identify appropriate fellowship.
  • Approach faculty for advice and letters of recommendation.
  • Consult with the Fellowship Coordinator if the fellowship requires university endorsement.

Senior Year

  • Prepare and submit application.
  • Interview, if required.
  • Receive award notification.

Generally you should expect to apply in the fall of the year preceding the year you would receive funding.

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What can the CCS Fellowships Program offer me?

Presentations:

  • Discovering Fellowship Opportunities
    To bring this talk to your department or student organization, contact the Fellowship Coordinator, Beth Fiori at btf1@cornell.edu.
  • Information Sessions on the Truman, Rhodes Scholarship, Marshall Scholarship, Churchill Scholarship, and others.
  • Workshops on assessing your candidacy for particular fellowships and on specific application strategies.

Advising:

  • Advice on application strengths and weaknesses
  • Interview preparation

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Graduate Study: Admissions Test

How should I prepare?

Yes, and how you prepare is also very important. A study done by LSAT indicates that "... (1) test takers who prepare in some way perform better than those who do not and (2) test takers who use multiple methods of preparation tend to perform better than those who use a single method." The study also indicates that for those who use only one method, working through one or more actual tests is the most effective method. As all three LSAT question types are included in the GRE and two of them in the GMAT, and verbal reasoning is in all admission tests, results of the LSAT test preparation survey can be generalized for other graduate and professional school tests.

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What should I use to prepare?

The best (authentic) test preparation materials come from the test publishers themselves. Materials from other, commercial sources vary considerably in quality, may be inaccurate, and are very difficult for you to evaluate. Though many of you may not wish to give ETS or MCAT additional patronage, professional advisors suggest using their preparatory materials because they are significantly better in quality.

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Where can I obtain test prep materials?

Test preparation materials are in the Cornell Career Services Library, 103 Barnes Hall, and can be used or copied there. The materials can also can be obtained from bookstores, online, or publishers for your use elsewhere, as detailed below. It is preferable to use test preparation materials from another test to practice than to use the less instructive commercial test prep books or a teacher who doesn't emphasize deductive and inductive thought processes, the methods of analysis and synthesis, that all the tests share. Cornell has tried to teach you to be resourceful, critical, and selective. This is an ideal time to apply that training.

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Credential Services

I'm a grad student, and I want my advisor/placement officer/DGS to have access to the contents of my file. How will this work?

Request that Interfolio distribute a copy of your file to your advisor/placement officer/DGS.

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What if my letter writers don't want to submit their recommendations electronically?

Although your references can register (at no charge) with Interfolio and send their letters via the Internet, they aren’t obligated to do so. Letters can also be submitted by U.S. Mail.

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What if my references have concerns about Interfolio?

They have some choices. They can send their letters directly to the schools or employers, or, perhaps more conveniently, to Interfolio. Cornell Career Services considered extensive input from faculty members before deciding to use Interfolio, and we’ve informed all Cornell departments about this service. If your references have any questions, we’ll be glad to advise them

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